MainWP Blog

How to use Action Log for MainWP
Extension Tutorials
Sebastian Moran

Using the Activity Log for MainWP Extension

MainWP now has a very useful way to track changes made on both the MainWP Dashboard site, as well as tracking changes to connected child sites using Activity Log for MainWP extension. First, you will need to install the WP Security Audit Log plugin on all of the connected child sites, which is very easy to bulk install plugins on your MainWP Dashboard site. Next, you will need to install the Activity Log for MainWP extension on your MainWP Dashboard site. Once the Activity Log for MainWP extension has been installed, follow the setup wizard for which child sites where

remove gutenberg banner
Extension Tutorials
Bogdan Rapaic

How to hide the Gutenberg Banner from your child sites

WordPress 4.9.8 release, scheduled for July 31, 2018, will include a banner inviting website owners to try the new Gutenberg editing experience. This banner shows for all users with the back end access and each user needs to dismiss it individually. Hiding this banner on multiple sites can take you some time, however, MainWP Code Snippets Extension can come handy and save you some time. With the following snippet, you can hide the banner directly from your dashboard and hide it for all users. Code for removing Gutenberg Invite Banner Add the following information to your Code Snippets Extension and then

Monetizing your new Extension

In creating these series of posts I am trying to make sure that developers and companies that want to integrate their services into MainWP have the tools at hand to easily work with a framework to create their final product. I want to ensure that you have the help you need to add your functionality and unique product or service to MainWP as a whole. In the previous posts we have covered how to create a basic WordPress plugin, connecting it to and turning that basic plugin into an extension inside of MainWP, then passing information to a child site in

Extensions using Classes in MainWP

MainWP has become an invaluable tool in my arsenal of weapons against compromised sites and people trying to compromise my clients. It helps me maintain and upgrade all of my client sites, as well as back them up on a daily basis. I store full server backups as well as individual site backups thanks to the set of tools I have available, and Amazon handles all of my backup needs, with MainWP as the facilitator. Without the remote backups extension, I can only imagine how expensive my server bill would be on a monthly basis – when adding 20GB a

Passing Information to your Child Sites

This post is part of a tutorial on creating your own MainWP Extension 1. How to create a basic WordPress plugin 2. Turning that basic plugin into an MainWP Extension 3. Passing Information to the Child site 4. Extensions using Classes in MainWP 5. Monetizing your new Extension This is the third post in a series of posts (Post 1, Post 2) about creating a plugin that can be used as a MainWP Extension. Once we’re done this series of blog posts, you’ll have a working plugin recognized by WordPress that is also recognized by MainWP as an extension. It

Connecting your Plugin to MainWP

This is Part 2 (part 1) in a series of blog posts surrounding WordPress Plugins, MainWP Extensions, and putting it all together in a useful way. Once we’re done this series of blog posts, you’ll have a working plugin recognized by WordPress that is also recognized by MainWP as an extension. It will be able to interact with your WordPress installation as well as your MainWP plugin. Look for Part 1 in the series here. This post is part of a tutorial on creating your own MainWP Extension 1. How to create a basic WordPress plugin 2. Turning that basic

Creating a WordPress Plugin

I’m going to dive right into this blog post on creating a plugin for WordPress. There are countless tutorials out there and ways to code and structure a plugin, but for the purposes of these articles I’m going to make it short and simple. Once we’re done this series of blog posts, you’ll have a working plugin recognized by WordPress that is also recognized by MainWP as an extension. It will be able to interact with your WordPress installation as well as your MainWP plugin (which by the way does amazing things for client management, if you haven’t checked it